Utes’ only senior, Marc Reininger, finally gets some extended minutes during Colorado loss

first_img Colorado head coach Tad Boyle directs his team against Utah in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski, AP Colorado guard Tyler Bey, top, hangs from the rim after dunking over Utah forward Timmy Allen in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Colorado guard Tyler Bey, center, pulls in a rebound between Utah center Lahat Thioune, left, and forward Timmy Allen in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. “He’ll screen, the first time he had an opportunity to screen, we got a bucket,” said Krystkowiak, “He’s bigger and stronger but he’s not exactly game-ready. He’s been out for a long time but I give Mark a lot of credit for banging and bringing that physicality.” With the Utes young and thin inside, Reininger may be called on for more duty as the season rolls along. Utah head coach Larry Krystkowiak calls for a timeout in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Colorado, Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Colorado forward Evan Battey, left, passes the ball as Utah forward Mikael Jantunen defends in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski, AP David Zalubowski, AP Colorado guard Daylen Kountz, right, drives to the basket as Utah guard Alfonso Plummer, left, and forward Riley Battin defend in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Colorado forward Evan Battey, front, drives to the basket as Utah center Branden Carlson defends in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski, AP David Zalubowski, AP Colorado head coach Tad Boyle directs his team against Utah in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Colorado guard McKinley Wright IV reacts after hitting a three-point basket against Utah in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah center Lahat Thioune, back, wrestles away a rebound from Colorado forward Evan Battey, front right, as Colorado guard McKinley Wright IV, left, looks on in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah forward Timmy Allen, left, passes the ball under defensive pressure from Colorado guard Tyler Bey, back, and guard McKinley Wright IV in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski, AP Utah center Lahat Thioune, center, fights for control of a rebound with Colorado guard McKinley Wright IV, left, and forward Evan Battey in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah forward Timmy Allen, left, passes the ball under defensive pressure from Colorado guard Tyler Bey, back, and guard McKinley Wright IV in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Colorado guard D’Shawn Schwartz, front, looks to pass the ball as Utah forward Timmy Allen defends in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah forward Mikael Jantunen, left, looks to pass the ball as Colorado guard D’Shawn Schwartz defends in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah forward Riley Battin, left, prepares to go for a basket as Colorado forward Lucas Siewert and guard Maddox Daniels defend in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah head coach Larry Krystkowiak, left, confers with center Lahat Thioune who returns to the bench in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Colorado, Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah head coach Larry Krystkowiak calls for a timeout in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Colorado, Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah guard Rylan Jones, left, passes the ball under defensive pressure from Colorado guard D’Shawn Schwartz in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski, AP Utah center Lahat Thioune, back, wrestles away a rebound from Colorado forward Evan Battey, front right, as Colorado guard McKinley Wright IV, left, looks on in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski, AP Utah forward Timmy Allen, center, goes up for a basket between Colorado guards D’Shawn Schwartz, back, and Tyler Bey in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo.center_img Utah forward Riley Battin, left, prepares to go for a basket as Colorado forward Lucas Siewert and guard Maddox Daniels defend in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah guard Rylan Jones, left, passes the ball under defensive pressure from Colorado guard D’Shawn Schwartz in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Grid View Colorado forward Evan Battey, left, passes the ball as Utah forward Mikael Jantunen defends in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Colorado guard Eli Parquet, right, drives to the basket past Utah forward Mikael Jantunen in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Colorado guard Tyler Bey, top, hangs from the rim after dunking over Utah forward Timmy Allen in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski, AP Colorado guard Eli Parquet, right, drives to the basket past Utah forward Mikael Jantunen in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Despite the loss, it was satisfying for Reininger because he’s from Monument, Colorado and he had family and friends on hand. “It’s always a hard gym to play in, because it’s so intense, but it’s fun to play in front of family and friends,” he said. “I’m grateful for the opportunity to play.” Reininger ended up playing 11 minutes on the night with a 3-point basket and 1-of-3 from the free throw line and four rebounds. He also made a nice screen when he first entered the game, something his coach took notice of. Colorado guard Tyler Bey, center, pulls in a rebound between Utah center Lahat Thioune, left, and forward Timmy Allen in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski, AP David Zalubowski, AP David Zalubowski, AP David Zalubowski, AP Utah forward Mikael Jantunen, left, looks to pass the ball as Colorado guard D’Shawn Schwartz defends in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski, AP BOULDER — During his first three years on the Utah basketball team, Marc Reininger only got into games at the end of blowouts for a couple of minutes at a time. He has been a valuable practice player for the Utes, but this year, as the only senior on the team, he had not played all season because of a serious ankle injury he suffered in July.However, midway through the first half of Sunday’s game against Colorado, Reininger was inserted into the game at the center position and he played his longest stretch of his career, getting four points and four rebounds in eight first-half minutes. He’s only been practicing for two weeks, but he said coach Larry Krystkowiak told him to be ready to play Sunday.“It’s good to be back,” said the 6-foot-9, 230-pounder. “I’m glad the coach put me in and believed in me. I’ve kind of accepted my role in making my team better. Coach puts me in to be physical and rebound, we need that as much as we can get it.” David Zalubowski, AP David Zalubowski, AP Colorado guard D’Shawn Schwartz, front, looks to pass the ball as Utah forward Timmy Allen defends in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah center Lahat Thioune, center, fights for control of a rebound with Colorado guard McKinley Wright IV, left, and forward Evan Battey in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. David Zalubowski, AP David Zalubowski, AP Colorado guard Daylen Kountz, right, drives to the basket as Utah guard Alfonso Plummer, left, and forward Riley Battin defend in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah head coach Larry Krystkowiak, left, confers with center Lahat Thioune who returns to the bench in the second half of an NCAA college basketball game against Colorado, Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Colorado guard McKinley Wright IV reacts after hitting a three-point basket against Utah in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Colorado forward Evan Battey, front, drives to the basket as Utah center Branden Carlson defends in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo. Utah forward Timmy Allen, center, goes up for a basket between Colorado guards D’Shawn Schwartz, back, and Tyler Bey in the first half of an NCAA college basketball game Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020, in Boulder, Colo.last_img read more

Risk Corridors Become Key GOP AntiHealth Law Talking Point

first_imgDuring a hearing of the House Oversight And Government Reform Committee, Republicans tagged this provision as an insurance industry bailout despite Congressional Budget Office projections cited by Democrats that it ultimately will collect billions of dollars from insurers rather than paying them money.  The Washington Post: Republicans Take Aim At Health-Care Provision; CBO Chief Forecasts Reduced Unemployment Congressional Republicans took aim Wednesday at a provision of the health-care law that they claim amounts to “an insurance company bailout,” using a House oversight hearing to push for the measure’s repeal. In a separate House committee hearing, Democrats countered what has emerged as a key GOP talking point by eliciting testimony from the Congressional Budget Office director that the Affordable Care Act would reduce unemployment over the next few years by boosting overall demand for goods and services (Branigin, 2/5). Kaiser Health News: Health On The Hill: Hill Republicans Hammer Health Law’s ‘Risk Corridors’Republicans labeled the provision a bailout for insurers despite projections it will raise $8 billion. Kaiser Health News staff writers Julie Appleby and Mary Agnes Carey look at the latest GOP attack on the law (2/5). The Wall Street Journal’s Washington Wire: CBO Estimate on ‘Health Corridors’ Doesn’t Change GOP ConcernsRepublicans lawmakers weren’t swayed by Tuesday’s Congressional Budget Office report that seemed to exonerate the “risk corridor” provision in the Affordable Care Act – a provision many Republicans have called a bailout for insurance companies. The CBO estimated the government would actually collect about $8 billion rather than pay money to insurance companies. Previously, it had projected no returns for the government. At a House Oversight and Government Reform Committee hearing Wednesday, Republicans continued to press for legislation to undo the provision, which had been designed to reduce the financial risk to insurers who sold health care plans on the new exchanges (Corbett Dooren, 2/5). NPR: Obamacare Opponents Open New Front For Debate In ‘Risk Corridors’Some Republicans have begun to demand the repeal of a key feature in the president’s health care law, which protects insurance companies taking part, in exchange for agreeing to raise the nation’s debt ceiling. But according to Congressional Budget Office Director Douglas Elmendorf, the so-called “risk corridors” actually benefit the Treasury, rather than costing taxpayers money (Welna, 2/5).  ‘Risk Corridors’ Become Key GOP Anti-Health Law Talking Point This is part of the KHN Morning Briefing, a summary of health policy coverage from major news organizations. Sign up for an email subscription.last_img read more

Nature never intended that womans waists should be like wasps Victorian advice

first_imgDecades before relationship advice columnists became a thing and a lucrative venture of their own, Victorian Age women were not short of guide books on how to be the “perfect lady.” One tome in particular that was dusted off in 2015 is a self-help book destined to answer questions related to subjects such as women’s relationships with men, in a wonderfully modern style. Some advice provided doesn’t need much of an update even these days, such as that health should not be sacrificed over beauty, but at other instances, the zeitgeist of the era prevails. Sexism has not been defeated, yet.Queen Victoria by Bassano.The self-help book Advice to Single Women, published in 1899, was dug out from forgotten shelves of the British Library. Its writer is unsurprisingly a male, Haydn Brown, who worked as a physician.Georgina Ward, Countess of Dudley, 1902.“We decided to reprint the book so that readers can raise an eyebrow and have a chuckle about the attitudes, opinions and social quirks of yesteryear,” said Robert Davis from the British Library, according to the Mirror. Haydn Brown’s book has been reprinted 116 years after its original issue.So, what’s there to chuckle at? Bear with us. And bear also with the presence of unfriendly-to-gender-equality vocabulary that’s in the fabric of Brown’s writing.Victorian womenThe 19th century writer is positive that it is best for a woman to marry between the age of 21 and 25, because “if she marry young, before her body be properly developed, there would be the danger of an abnormal child-birth,” as shared by the Telegraph.And how is marriage itself commended in the book? Well, the young female population of Britain at the turn of the centuries is told that: “A married life conduces to such correctness of living as tends to improve and steady the general conduct.”Victorian fashions were quite different from today, but women spent no less time perfecting their look.Some of Brown’s other tips sound strangely more modern than this. Should a woman avoid the hardship of marriage and instead opt for a life as a single woman? There is a ‘why not’ nod to that: “The best plan for women to adopt therefore, is to aim singleness if they wish to double themselves — whether with capabilities, riches, or marriage. And a single life is not so bad after all, even if it does go on to the end. By itself, and still more by the thought and expectation of it, it leads to useful occupation and healthy industry.”Thirty years before Virginia Woolf notably contemplated in her 1929 A Room of One’s Own that without financial independence, women will fail to fully prosper in fulfilling their intellectual or creative capabilities, Brown also cared to phrase the following sentence as well:“In a word, singleness permits of greater and more valuable concentration in work, and it avoids the innumerable little worries inseparable from parent-hood.”Virginia Woolf.Another of the benefits of being single? “Single women who have been industrious, and who have boldly carved out a career for themselves, can afford to snap their fingers at lost lovers, and thank the fate that at length designed them for a life of single success rather than the possible one of married misery.”That Brown complies with the well-established sexism of his days is evident at a number of places, however. As the Washington Post’s Jean R. Freedman also remarks in her take on Brown’s book, the 19th century writer suggests that “nervousness and timidity” are part of a woman’s nature. Also, that women look after a spouse who is “in many ways mightier.”Their First Quarrel, an illustration by Charles Dana Gibson, 1914.It is further said that a woman’s love “will wane” or that “her admiration will sicken and die” if her man over time acts with effeminacy.A cup of tea, dear? You might want a sip after reading another piece of advice that now illustrates the benefit of being married: “Sexual indulgences, are, under marriage association, kept down to a reasonable and harmless minimum.”Painting of a woman serving teaAccordingly, sexual intercourse within marriage is also described as “most complete, and most promising for the future of the race.” It is “exclusive and regulated by the bonds of religion and custom; not promiscuous and deviating, not varied and risky, not way-ward and wanton, but right and orderly.” Thank you very much!Contemporary commentators on matters like this may greatly dismantle much of Brown’s take on sex within relationships. And perhaps less will be disregarded from the writer’s take on women wearing corsets as part of their outfit, which was a big thing in Victorian days.According to Brown, tight-lacing may accomplish having more tiny-looking waists, but the practice is also referred to as harmful to the body, affecting functions such as breathing and digestion. Which was true. The Victorian-era corset has been found to have had lasting damaging effects on women’s skeletons. Worn too tight, it sometimes severely impacted both the ribs and the spine.Ladies’ Home Journal, October 1898.“Substitute ‘eating disorders’ for ‘tight-lacing,’ and Brown’s advice barely needs updating,” further writes Freedman for the Washington Post, referring to modern-day habits utilized in the name of beauty, at the expense of health.In this sense, the advice may read as a well-intended message. “Nature never intended that woman’s waists should be like wasps’,” Brown remarks.Frances Benjamin Johnston’s Self-Portrait (as “New Woman”), 1896.But a “Yeah, right” moment might be when another bit on this topic informs the reader that “men do not fall in love with a tiny waist, unless the owner happens to have several other points of beauty to carry it off.”The list of what a man is likely to find attractive in women includes “proportion and artistic beauty,” as well as “ease and grace of movement.” That, according to the writer, is “all bound together not by a corset but by ineffable manner of charm.”Of course, Brown’s book was written in an entirely different society when attitudes towards women were merely beginning to change for good. Fast forward a century: women have gained the right to vote, to control what happens with their body, and to control who they chose as a partner for marriage.Read another story from us: The life of Mary Queen of Scots – Married 3 times, imprisoned and her untimely endIceland has become the first country in the world where equal payment between men and women should be respected by the law. And New Zealand has a female prime minister who just recently gave a birth to her baby. In 1899, many of these things were unthinkable.last_img read more