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We want your pick for the best health and science books to read this summer

first_img [email protected] By STAT staff May 28, 2019 Reprints About the Author Reprints Don’t MissWe want your pick for the best health and science books to read this summer Summer is around the corner. And STAT wants to know which books with health, medicine, or science themes you’d recommend people toss in their vacation bag.Fill out the form below, and you may see your pick in our upcoming list. To get a little inspiration, check out our past summer book lists from 2018, 2017, and 2016.The submission period has ended. STAT staff CHARLY TRIBALLEAU/AFP/Getty Imageslast_img read more

Student voice drives change in Portlaoise College

first_img Facebook By Alan Hartnett – 10th June 2019 GAA Pinterest Twitter RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSPortlaoise College Student voice drives change in Portlaoise College GAA 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Students Kyra Stodel, Witkoria Wojtkiewicz, Fionn McEvoy Mullally and Poppy Mullen with Mr. Shane Kelly and Ms. Catriona Walsh The student council of Portlaoise College played a significant role in the introduction of a new school jumper for the academic year 2019-20 and beyond.The student council was part of the consultative process and were active in the design and material selected for the jumper.Student council’s are all about the student voice and the elected representatives for each year group do their utmost to air the views of the entire student population.Student council liaison teachers Mr. Shane Kelly and Ms. Catriona Walsh facilitated the members as they negotiated their way through the process.This also involved the parents council, staff and the board of management.The new jumper is the fruit of considerable effort, students Kyra Stodel, Witkoria Wojtkiewicz, Fionn McEvoy Mullally and Poppy Mullen helped to display the jumper in the picture above.Fair play to all involved!SEE ALSO – Laois footballers All-Ireland Qualifier opponents confirmed following draw Facebook WhatsApp Pinterest Home News Student voice drives change in Portlaoise College News Previous articleIn Pictures: All-Ireland Rounders success for EmoNext articlePortlaoise family on the never-ending fight to get services for their child with intellectual disabilities Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results WhatsApp Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory GAA Twitterlast_img read more

Today FM announces Gavin James as Headline Act for Sound Garden Stage at Electric Picnic

first_img By Alan Hartnett – 16th August 2019 GAA WhatsApp Today FM announces Gavin James as Headline Act for Sound Garden Stage at Electric Picnic Facebook Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results This is exciting!Today FM has announced that Gavin James will headline its Sound Garden Stage at this year’s Electric Picnic. Gavin, who performed on the main stage at the festival last year, will be taking to the Sound Garden Stage on Friday evening, 30th of August.Just four years after his platinum-selling single ‘Bitter Pill’, the Irish singer songwriter has had 7 sold-out performances in Ireland and is in the middle of his 2019 World tour with upcoming gigs in Portugal, The Philippines’ and France.Announcing details of his festival performance this morning, Gavin James told Today FM listeners: “I can’t wait to kick off the Sound Garden Stage with Today FM at Electric Picnic, it is going to be all of the craic!”This year, Today FM was announced as the Official Radio Partner of Electric Picnic 2019 and has dedicated the month of August to promoting the festival on air and online, giving listeners multiple chances to win much sought tickets to the sold-out festival.Over on Instagram and Facebook (@todayfm) Today FM is also giving ticket winners the chance to win an exclusive meet and greet with Gavin James at the picnic.Now in its 5th year at Electric Picnic, Today FM’s Sound Garden Stage, situated in the main festival arena, is set to be the biggest yet, with a specially curated line up of live performances, DJ’s entertainment and comedy.Today FM will continue to announce its Sound Garden line up in the run up to the festival weekend.Speaking about this year’s festival partnership, Today FM’s Head of Marketing, Róisín Reilly said; “This year, we wanted to create something really special to celebrate our Official Radio Partnership with Electric Picnic – so we’ve made the Sound Garden even bigger and developed a packed weekend line-up of live music, themed DJ sets and huge artist interviews.“Electric Picnic is the festival everyone wants to be at and music-wise, it’s the biggest thing Today FM will do all summer. We are so excited to get to Stradbally!”While Today FM’s Content & Programme Director, Adelle Nolan said; “To have an artist like Gavin James headlining the opening night for Todays FM’s Sound Garden is unbelievably exciting and further cements our commitment to bring the very best Irish music to our listeners”The Today FM Sound Garden Stage is situated straight across from the main stage, just look out for the big yellow tent and follow the music.SEE ALSO – Laois hurler to be part of Sunday Game panel after All Ireland final Home Lifestyle Electric Picnic Today FM announces Gavin James as Headline Act for Sound Garden Stage… LifestyleElectric Picnic Previous articleLaois hurler to be part of Sunday Game panel after All Ireland finalNext articleAhead of the All Ireland hurling final we’ve picked out 10 Tipperary people who’ve made a massive impact on the world Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. TAGSElectric PicnicGavin James WhatsApp Twitter Twitter Pinterest RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR GAA GAA Pinterest Facebook Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshinlast_img read more

Mother’s Day ‘thank you’ ribbons banned, deemed threat to cult of…

first_imgPyongyang residents shop for flower bouquets – a popular Mother’s Day gift. Image: North Korean state television KCTV News Facebook Twitter But although the regime has banned overt expressions of thanks to mothers, the culture of gift-giving for the holiday is growing. In May of 2012, the standing committee of North Korea’s Supreme People’s Assembly designated November 16 Mother’s Day in the spirit of a speech given by Kim Il Sung on the same day in 1961 acknowledging “motherly duties for educating children.” “It is really sad that people have to express thanks to ‘the father’ Kim Jong Un after every little thing he does, but we cannot express thanks to our actual mothers on Mother’s Day.”  By Daily NK – 2017.11.20 3:30pm News This year’s November 16 marked the sixth year of the new Mother’s Day holiday in North Korea, first instituted by Kim Jong Un after he came to power in 2011. The holiday is intended to highlight the role of mothers as the “amazing teachers and guides” of the nation. But the authorities have banned people from attaching any special messages of thanks to bouquets of flowers sent to mothers for the occasion, which is seen as a threat that diminishes the nation’s cult of personality for its leaders. “Poor children of farmers may prepare breakfast for their mothers or do some extra chores around the house instead of purchasing a gift,” he added. Young students are taught in school that it’s the child’s duty to assist their mother with her tasks on Mother’s Day.  Mother’s Day ‘thank you’ ribbons banned, deemed threat to cult of personality “Mirrors, socks, and gloves are sold for around 5,000-10,000 KPW. Grown children often give clothes or money, while younger children save their allowance or part-time job earnings to buy some winter gloves for their mother, for instance,” a separate source in South Pyongan Province said. Proposal to shift “general markets” to “specialized markets” finds little support among N. Korean leaders SHARE NewsEconomy RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR North Korea Market Price Update: June 8, 2021 (Rice and USD Exchange Rate Only) A source in South Pyongan Province informed Daily NK on November 15 that “when the holiday was first announced, people were not that fussed. But as the regime began pushing propaganda about the holiday in subsequent years, people have started putting more thought into what to buy their mothers in the days leading up to the holiday.”“As the day became more popular, state-run shops and other merchants began offering various kinds of flower arrangements. But the regime has begun restricting the practice of attaching ribbons signifying a ‘thank you’ or ‘I love you’ since it encroaches upon the significance of cult-of-personality offerings of flower baskets in front of portraits (of Kim Il Sung and Kim Jong Il),” he added.“People are starting to say that in North Korea, there are fathers but no mothers, a reflection of discontent towards the patriarchal nature of society,” the source said.  News US dollar and Chinese reminbi plummet against North Korean won once again AvatarDaily NKQuestions or comments about this article? Contact us at [email protected] last_img read more

Chief actuary says CPP sustainable over long term

first_img Related news Facebook LinkedIn Twitter CPPIB reports record return for latest fiscal year Some provinces, notably Ontario and Prince Edward Island, want to increase CPP benefits to keep seniors who have no other pension plan from falling into poverty. But Flaherty and some provinces say they don’t want to raise premiums at a time of weak economic growth. Meanwhile, the chief actuary says the current contribution rate of 9.9 per cent of pensionable earnings — shared equally between employers and employees — is sufficient to cover current benefits offered by the CPP until 2022. After that, a portion of the investment income from the plan will need to be used to pay benefits to the growing number of retired Canadians. But the report notes that CPP should have plenty of investment income to draw on. Total assets of the plan are expected to rise from $175 billion in 2012 to $300 billion by 2020, with the ratio of assets to expenditures continually rising from the current 4.7 to 5.9 in 2075. “Under the 9.9 per cent legislated contribution rate, the assets are projected to grow rapidly over the next decade as contribution revenue is expected to exceed expenditures over that period,” the report states. The minimum contribution rate actually needed to sustain the plan is 9.84 per cent for the year 2016 and afterwards, the actuary says. The report says the number of retired beneficiaries drawing CPP is expected to grow from the current 4.6 million to 10.2 million by 2050. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Canadian Press center_img Equity markets lift CPP in Q3 Canada’s chief actuary says the Canada Pension Plan is sustainable over the long term. The report from the chief actuary comes as Finance Minister Jim Flaherty and his provincial counterparts prepare to meet in Ottawa with expansion of the CPP as a key topic under discussion. CPP Investments CEO resigns after travelling for Covid-19 vaccine Keywords Canada Pension Plan last_img read more

Cutting super will send retirement balances of Rockhampton women into freefall

first_imgCutting super will send retirement balances of Rockhampton women into freefall Industry Super AustraliaAn alarming gender gap sees Rockhampton women retire with super balances less than half that of men, without urgent action to arrest the slide women will keep falling further behind.Rockhampton women on the cusp of retirement have a median super balance of just $113,600 – well below the $545,000 needed for a comfortable retirement.These stark figures highlight the need to lift the super rate as legislated from 9.5% to 12%. Women on middle to low-income are the most likely to get the legislated super boost, lifting the rate will give them the power to choose how they live in retirement.A 30-year-old woman on the median wage could have up to $85,000 less at retirement if the super rate is cut, which could cause a generation of Rockhampton women to suffer further economic insecurity.The gender super gap in Rockhampton opens when a woman is in her 30s, once a Rockhampton woman is in her 50s and 60s most can expect to have half as much super as the average Rockhampton man.While the gender super gap widens the government has been dragging its feet on important reforms which will improve Rockhampton women’s retirement outcomes including:· Paying super on every dollar earnt, including Commonwealth paid parental leave;· Abolishing the $450 threshold where super is not paid unless you earn more than that a month, this greatly impacts women as they are more likely to have multiple part-time jobs;· Failing to enact super splitting legislation, this streamlines the process of dividing super assets when a relationship ends and allows more women to get their fair share.A recent retirement survey, commissioned by ISA, found that on average women spend 12 years less in the full-time workforce than men, this time away from work is having a dramatic impact on their super balance.One in three women retire with no super balance at all, according to a 2016 Senate report.Despite the importance of lifting super to improve women’s retirement outcomes the government has said it is considering cutting super at 9.5%, even as government MPs – like Michelle Landry – pocket more than 15% super on top of their parliamentary wages. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:arrest, commonwealth, Dollar, fair share, full-time, Government, Impact, legislation, outcomes, retirement, Rockhampton, Senate, super, survey, women, workforcelast_img read more

On 75th Anniversary of Founding of Italian Republic

first_imgOn 75th Anniversary of Founding of Italian Republic On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I send sincere congratulations to the people of Italy as they celebrate the 75th anniversary of the founding of the Italian Republic.On this day, Italy and the United States celebrate our deep and enduring friendship which is based on shared values, including democracy, freedom, free and fair trade, and the rule of law. Our countries and cultures continue to be enriched by deep people-to-people ties, illustrated by the millions of proud Americans of Italian ancestry.It was my pleasure to welcome Foreign Minister Di Maio to Washington to commemorate the 160th anniversary of the establishment of U.S.-Italy diplomatic relations. Our partnership has never been more important, and we look forward to continued close cooperation with Italy, both as NATO Allies and long-standing economic partners, as we address global challenges and build a better, more prosperous world. /Public Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:america, anniversary, Democracy, Department of State, diplomatic, foreign minister, Government, Italy, law, military, Minister, NATO, rule of law, trade, United States, Washington, worldlast_img read more

Staff Council Spotlight: Vince Aquino, Lead Arborist

first_img Published: Sept. 8, 2014 Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail What is your official title at CU-Boulder? How long have you been here? What is the nature of your role?I am the Lead Arborist for Facilities Operations for Facilities Management on Boulder’s Main Campus. I started at CU in 1997 as a six-month temp, and then I extended, and then I was brought on full time. I think I’m going on my sixteenth year as a full time employee. I’m responsible for all of the trees in the General Fund areas on campus. By General Fund, I mean all the academic buildings and the common areas, a lot of the fields, the open areas on campus. I work with one other person directly, Joel Serafin. And we take on guys from the other crews.We do care and maintenance, installations and removals for all the trees in those areas. We have about 4,000 trees. I’m from Chicago originally, and I came out here with my family in late grade school… my dad worked at CSU, he worked in biology as well, he worked in clinical pathology as a lab technician and that had a huge influence on my interest in biology and life science.What kind of educational and professional background do you have? How does one end up being an arborist?I’m probably not really the typical way. I don’t have a degree. I studied some forestry and a lot of ecosystem biology. I was always very interested in that stuff, but never finished a degree. And I was working in trucking and warehousing and that type of work from my teens until my early thirties. And that’s when I came on here and I just wanted to work outside so I got a job as a grounds keeper, and I always had a lot of interest in forestry and tree care. And I had a little bit of experience and background in it and as people saw that I had an aptitude for it and an interest in it, they encouraged it and I was able to get more training. I was able to pick up more skills, learn more techniques and go to conferences and workshops. And I was able to work with people from the outside, from the city and different people, and was able to learn quite a bit and I was eventually promoted into a Lead Arborist position here. I think I’ve worked hard to learn a lot of things and do a lot of things, but I kind of got lucky too, and I was in the right place at the right time.What is your favorite kind of tree and why?Oh boy. So, I guess, from a maintenance standpoint of trees that are around here, my favorite would be the Kentucky coffee tree. We have a handful of them on campus. They have really interesting bark texture and an unusual kind of serpentine, twisty canopy.My two favorite ones are by the Engineering Center, on the northwest and southwest corner; there are really cool Kentucky coffee trees there. I like the Kentucky coffee tree a lot because it’s so interesting in all seasons. I’m a wintertime person, I like the way things look in the winter. I like the bark texture, I like the silhouette of the canopy when it’s out of leaf, plus it has a circular, serpentine, kind of swirling crown and canopy. It doesn’t have the typical kind of scaffold branches; it’s got these kinds of unusual twists and turns. I call it a haunted house kind of quality, trees that kind of look like a haunted house in the old monster movies. I like that a lot and I think it’s an underutilized tree. And it’s a great tree for Colorado. And it’s a tree that people don’t think of as a shade tree for their yard, but I think they should because it has a lot going for it. It’s a good tree. It’s hard to say which is my favorite tree on campus, but if you had to hold me to it, I’d say the Kentucky coffee tree.My favorite trees altogether are the big guys on the west coast, like the giant Doug firs, the Port Orford cedars and the coastal redwoods. That stuff is pretty amazing. We actually planted a giant Sequoia on campus near Engineering. I’m hoping it will do pretty well, but we might not have the amount of water for it to get really big, but it’s growing fast and establishing. There was a spot there, and it was protected and out of the wind, and it won’t get vandalized there. Fingers crossed. It’s been there four or five years and it’s picking up steam.What do you find inspiring or gratifying about your work at CU Boulder?Well, I don’t want to sound too sappy…Was that pun intended?Oh no, I didn’t think of that! It was not intended. I don’t want to sound too corny, how about that? I really enjoy working outside and working with my hands, and I am really grateful to have this job because to me, it’s a great blend of intellectual and physical work. I get to work really hard, get dirty and tired, but I have to really think about what I’m doing. It’s cerebral, it’s artistic and it’s very interesting.I’ve been a biology nerd since I was a little boy. I guess I take satisfaction and I really enjoy the fact that in twenty and fifty, one hundred, and even two hundred years, there are going to be trees on this campus that I planted. Not just me, but my co-workers too, our group… trees that our crew planted. We’re part of the heritage of the land and our work has a major impact on the landscape for decades, and maybe even centuries. If that doesn’t inspire you, then I don’t know what else would. Doing that is cool, and it’s not just me, it’s groups of us who do this. I’m part of this whole group that’s making an impact on the aesthetics of campus for decades, and that’s really inspiring.If you had unlimited funds to do any kind of tree/arbor project on campus that you wanted, what would you do and why?If we had the money and the land, and the labor resources, I would like us to have our own nursery or growing operation. We’ve gotten some really good products over the years, but it’s tough to get exactly what you want the way you want it, the size and condition that you want it, and the time of year that you want it. I think it would be really interesting and really great if we grew our own stock, from either very small trees or even from seed in some cases, and cultivated and created our own stock of material for replacement. We could take our time and do it the right way and get the root material right. We could cultivate them the proper way and improve our success rate on stuff long term. We do pretty well, and we have a high rate of success on our plantings, but a great deal of the problems we have could be eliminated if we had our own nursery and we ran our own operation. We wouldn’t just be at the mercy of whatever is out there, whatever came in that month or that year. We usually have a nice selection, but every once in a while there is something unusual that you would like. And so we could cultivate our own specimen trees and we could take scions off of our existing, historical trees that we want to preserve. We’re going to try and do that anyway, but with a nursery, we could do a lot of that type of thing and have legacy trees. I think if I had a giant staff of people and a lot of money and some good land that would be kind of a dream thing to do.Why is your/your team’s work important and valuable for the campus?We’ve seen studies that indicate that people decide if they’re going to go to a university in the first twenty minutes that they’re there. Students get out of the car and walk around and they’ve already decided, I‘m not coming here or I love it. And what they see, the minute they get out the door, is our turf; the condition of our hardscapes; our shrubs and our trees; that the trash is picked up; the place is swept up; the mulch is where it’s supposed to be; and all that. That might not register explicitly that this is what they’re picking up on, but subconsciously they’re seeing a place where it’s obvious that people care. And of course, with the Flatirons background, that doesn’t hurt either. I think our team is critical to getting people interested in coming here and staying here.Obviously the academics are the principal motivation for considering CU in the first place, but once you’ve gotten off the plane, and you’re walking around campus, you see our work. I’d like to think it has a big impact on people’s decisions. I think they like it and they feel comfortable here, and they know it’s maintained. Parents see it and they know that someone here cares about the institution and the upkeep of the place, and that translates in other ways. It seems like a welcoming, reasonable place.Also, for my work partner and me, public safety is a huge part of it. We have approximately 4,000 cultivated trees on campus that we care for. It’s really difficult to keep track of the condition of all of those trees and to make sure that they’re safe to be under. We have to visually inspect, or climb, or use the bucket truck to get into these trees and inspect them. We always keep an eye on them and assess them after storm events, wind events and different things like that. And we have to watch for disease and pest issues, to make sure the structural integrity of the trees is above the threshold for public safety. It’s an enormous part of our work, and it’s the thing that wakes me up in the middle of the night, like when the wind blows and I hear the wind howling, I’m thinking, “I hope this and that are ok.” And to our credit, we take safety very seriously and we’ve spent a lot of years keeping everything as safe as we can and we work hard to do it. It’s an important part of the job and it’s a way that I feel that I have a direct impact on the safety and welfare of the public that uses our campus.CU-Boulder has the new “Be Boulder.” platform to highlight the positive impacts and achievements of the university, and is using “Be statements,” like “Be Innovative” or “Be Driven.” As the Lead Arborist on the CU-Boulder campus, what “Be statement” would you use?I would say, “Be flexible.” Every week and every day I have a work plan, but things rarely go as planned. Things change. We have a lot of construction and things that you don’t hear about until the last minute, and different projects and different installations and things. And so we frequently have to be flexible-minded, be open-minded to just switching gears and changing the type of work we’re doing pretty quickly. We also have to be flexible in that we have a lot of challenges for the types of trees we’re maintaining and that people want to install and have on campus. We have to do some new and creative things to get those trees to live here, because they don’t belong here. Also, a lot of people have really strong opinions about trees. People are emotional about trees, and they have strong feelings and strong ideas about what should and shouldn’t happen to the trees on campus. I have to make decisions about what to do on campus – sometimes based on safety – and so I have to be flexible and open-minded and satisfy a lot of different people and many different push-and-pulls. So as an arborist, I would say, “Be flexible. Be open-minded. Be creative. Be experimental.”“Staff Council Spotlight” is an initiative of the BCSC Awards & Staff Recognition Committee (BCSC/ASR). Contact Serena Leland, Boulder Campus Staff Council (BCSC) Representative, at [email protected] with comments or if you have a person you would like to recommend for the Spotlight series.last_img read more

PM for 21st Inter-Sessional Meeting of CARICOM Heads in Dominica

first_imgRelatedPM for 21st Inter-Sessional Meeting of CARICOM Heads in Dominica FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Prime Minister, Hon. Bruce Golding, will lead Jamaica’s delegation to the 21st inter-sessional meeting of CARICOM Heads of Government in Roseau, Dominica from March 11-12.The delegation leaves the island tomorrow (March 10) for Dominica.The Prime Minister will be accompanied by Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade, Dr. Ken Baugh and other top government officials.Key matters to be discussed at the meeting include the relief efforts in Haiti following the devastating earthquake on January 12, where Jamaica has been leading the CARICOM charge; and climate change issues.There will also be an exchange of views with the heads of the International Financial Institutions, including the World Bank, the Inter-American Development Bank, and the International Monetary Fund.Other matters on the agenda relate to external trade negotiations for a CARICOM-Canada Trade and Development Agreement; the status of the implementation of the CARIFORUM-European Union Economic Partnership Agreement; and the renewal of the Caribbean Basin Trade Partnership Act.During the Prime Minister’s absence, Minister of Industry, Investment and Commerce, Hon. Karl Samuda will be in charge of the government. Prime Minister Golding will return to the island on Saturday, March 13. RelatedPM for 21st Inter-Sessional Meeting of CARICOM Heads in Dominica PM for 21st Inter-Sessional Meeting of CARICOM Heads in Dominica Office of the Prime MinisterMarch 9, 2010center_img Advertisements RelatedPM for 21st Inter-Sessional Meeting of CARICOM Heads in Dominicalast_img read more

Jamaica to Benefit from Climate Change Resilience Project

first_imgStory HighlightsJamaica is one of three countries selected from Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) to benefit from a US$6 million regional climate change resilience project.It is proposed that the project, dubbed ‘Building climate resilience of urban systems through Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA) in LAC’, will be piloted in the Kingston Metropolitan Area.Implementation of the project is also being supported by the United Nations Environment Programme – Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean (ROLAC). Photo: JIS PhotographerMinister of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, Hon. Robert Pickersgill (left), listens to a point being made by National Consultant for a regional climate change resilience project, Una May Gordon (right), during the opening ceremony for a national workshop on the project, held at the Knutsford Court Hotel in Kingston, today (March 3). Also pictured is Consultant, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), Jacinto Buenfil. The US$6 million project, dubbed ‘Building climate resilience of urban systems through Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA) in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC)’, seeks to increase the climate change resilience of vulnerable urban communities in three medium-sized LAC cities in Jamaica, Mexico and El Salvador. Jamaica is one of three countries selected from Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) to benefit from a US$6 million regional climate change resilience project.It is proposed that the project, dubbed ‘Building climate resilience of urban systems through Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA) in LAC’, will be piloted in the Kingston Metropolitan Area.Expected to last 24 months, the project is to be executed in Jamaica by the Ministry of Water, Land, Environment and Climate Change, with financing from the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Special Climate Change Fund.Implementation of the project is also being supported by the United Nations Environment Programme – Regional Office for Latin America and the Caribbean (ROLAC).The objective of the project is to increase the climate change resilience of vulnerable urban communities in three medium-sized LAC cities in Jamaica, Mexico and El Salvador, through the application of EbA and its integration into medium-and long-term urban planning.In Jamaica, it is anticipated that the project will respond to the limitations highlighted in the country’s urban sector by developing new policies or adapting to existing/new strategies that will promote the concept of a Climate Smart Urban Area. It is also expected to bring the use of innovative participatory methodologies for integrating climate change into urban systems.A national workshop on the project was staged today (March 3) to provide relevant information as well as garner the input and recommendations of key stakeholders. Jamaica to Benefit from Climate Change Resilience Project EnvironmentMarch 4, 2015Written by: Alecia Smith-Edwards RelatedFire Hydrants in St. James Being Repaired Addressing the opening of the workshop, held at the Knutsford Court Hotel in Kingston, Portfolio Minister, Hon. Robert Pickersgill, welcomed the project, stressing that the issue of climate change must become a key factor in the future development plans for the country, particularly urban areas.“(We) must begin to think and plan in concrete ways in order to integrate climate considerations in all relevant plans and projects, to deal with rising temperatures, rising seas, deadlier disasters, and changing economic circumstances,” he said.The Minister noted that as the region and world become increasingly urbanised, cities are becoming the epicentres of many developmental challenges, including the challenge of building climate resilience.“This presents new challenges and opportunities to city planners, environmental planners, the construction sector and to civil society. These are very practical matters – where to build, how to build, and the role that ecosystem services can play – in order to develop and prosper within the new climate reality,” he said.In addressing these practical issues, the Minister stressed that climate change must move beyond mere awareness, but rather, “we must think creatively, constructively and very concretely about the future of our urban areas within a changed and changing climate.”The findings of the pilots in the three countries will be used to develop local, national and regional approaches to up-scaling adaptation through ecosystem restoration.Activities to be undertaken under this project are designed to benefit communities RelatedJamaica to Benefit from US$15 Million Climate Change Grant RelatedGov’t Making Strides Towards Creating a Green Economy FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Jamaica to Benefit from Climate Change Resilience ProjectJIS News | Presented by: PausePlay% buffered00:0000:00UnmuteMuteDisable captionsEnable captionsSettingsCaptionsDisabledQualityundefinedSpeedNormalCaptionsGo back to previous menuQualityGo back to previous menuSpeedGo back to previous menu0.5×0.75×Normal1.25×1.5×1.75×2×Exit fullscreenEnter fullscreenPlay Advertisementslast_img read more