Month: <span>September 2020</span>

Lovells ‘in US merger talks’

first_imgCity firm Lovells and US firm Hogan & Hartson are discussing a merger to create a firm with combined revenues of more than £1bn, according to reports. The firm would comprise 2,500 lawyers and would be among the 10 largest in the world if the tie-up goes ahead. A Lovells spokesperson said: ‘In the US, we have to date been focused on providing a clearly defined range of services that reflect our international strengths, and it is no secret that any significant expansion beyond that would require a major strategic move. ‘We review our US strategy on a regular basis and we have recently been taking a closer look at market developments and the opportunities that we believe are available to us. Beyond that, we are not in a position to comment further.’last_img read more

Tributes paid following death of Lord Bingham

first_imgTributes have been paid to Lord Bingham of Cornhill, the former lord chief justice and one of the pre-eminent judges of his generation, following his death on Saturday. He had been suffering from cancer and died at his home in Wales aged 76. Following a career at the bar, Lord Bingham’s distinguished judicial career saw him become the first ever judge to hold the top three judicial posts – master of the rolls, lord chief justice and senior law lord. His death was announced by the trustees of the British Institute of International and Comparative Law. Lord Bingham was president and chairman of the institute, which set up the Bingham Centre for the Rule of Law in his honour. Institute director Robert McCorquodale said: ‘The trustees, members and staff express their deepest sympathy to Lady Bingham and the rest of his family for their great loss. The passing of this exceptional man will also be mourned by innumerable members of the legal community, both in Britain and in the wider world. ‘He will be remembered for his outstanding career, his brilliant mind and his impeccable judgement, as well as for his vast reserves of energy, his humility and his warmth towards others. We will miss him greatly.’ Lord Chief Justice Lord Judge said: ‘On behalf of the judiciary of England and Wales, I would like to express my sorrow at the death of Tom Bingham, the most respected, distinguished and admired judge of our times.’ ‘His contributions to our understanding of the significance of the rule of law, and the principled development of the common law, have been unequalled in our generation. ‘Judges throughout the world will recognise Tom Bingham as one of the great jurists of this generation and one of the great common law judges.’last_img read more

Lord Young attacks personal injury ‘lottery’

first_imgThe peer leading the government’s review of the ‘compensation culture’ said this week that he is ‘ashamed’ of some personal injury lawyers in respect of how they advertise their services. Addressing the Conservative Party conference, Lord Young of Graffham (pictured) claimed that some personal injury advertising offers ‘a free lottery ticket where you win as you enter’. Young said that his forthcoming report on health and safety legislation ‘runs no risk of being pigeonholed’, and will become government policy. Prime minister David Cameron has asked him to stay on after his report is published to help implement the changes, Young said. Young’s report, which was due to be released at the end of the summer, is now expected to be published shortly. In September, Gazette sources suggested that Young would not seek to ban PI TV advertising, but would instead call for restrictions. Young said at the conference: ‘As a one-time lawyer, I am today ashamed of the depths some in the law have stooped to, with their aggressive “no-win, no-fee” advertising. ‘We have all seen adverts in the newspapers, on the radio and television, saying if you think you have a claim, come to us and if our solicitor agrees, you will walk away with a cheque for £500, just for putting in your claim. And that won’t affect any amount you might be awarded. ‘This is more than a free lottery ticket; this is a lottery where you win as you enter. What a temptation this provides to someone watching afternoon television. ‘This is not access to justice – this is incitement to litigate. And it must stop.’ Young added: ‘That is why we have a compensation culture. If anything happens to you it can’t possibly be your fault; sue someone, it won’t cost you a penny. That is why health and safety now looms so large in business, in education, in the health service. Not to stop accidents happening. But to stop being sued.’ A Law Society spokeswoman said: ‘Solicitors are frequently criticised for their part in fuelling what is perceived to be a compensation culture. That perception is fuelled by claims that victims seek compensation for the most trivial matters, and that costs paid to solicitors who assist those victims can be disproportionate to the actual value of the claim. ‘While costs can be disproportionate in certain cases, a main cause of this is the actual process which is required by the rules of court and evidence. The Law Society will continue to lobby government against any attempt to reduce access to justice for victims of negligence.’ Muiris Lyons, president of the Association of Personal Injury Lawyers, said: ‘In his bid to address the myth of a so-called “compensation culture” in this country, Lord Young is in real danger of turning the myth into a reality by creating a situation in which people will not be properly protected from the irresponsibility of those who cause injuries through their own negligence. This government must take the lead in stopping misplaced hysteria about the compensation system.’ Meanwhile a report based on a survey of 1,600 people published by National Accident Helpline last week found that 57% thought there was a ‘social stigma’ attached to making a claim for compensation.last_img read more

Company

first_img Stephen Auld QC and Richard Mott (instructed by Grosvenor Law) for the claimants. The defendants did not appear and were not represented. Apax Global Payment and Technologies Ltd and another company v Morina and others: Chancery Division (Mr Justice David Richards – judgment delivered extempore): 24 June 2011 Director – Fraud – Whether defendants guilty of breach of fiduciary dutycenter_img The first claimant company was engaged by the second claimant ­company to be payment processors for the gaming industry in Turkey. The relevant contracts were entered into between the parties. The first claimant went into liquidation and the defendants were all former officers of the first claimant and their associated companies. The claimants brought claims against the defendants, alleging that through the actions of the defendants, sums of $7m received by the claimants were misappropriated by the defendants. They claimed damages for fraud and breach of fiduciary duty. The defendants failed to defend the claim. The claim would be allowed. In the present case, funds received by the first claimant to be held on trust for the second claimant had been fraudulently misrepresented by the defendants. Each defendant was guilty of breach of fiduciary duty and dishonest assistance. The claimants were entitled to declarations that each of the defendants was liable for damages in the sum claimed.last_img read more

Fatal attraction

first_imgOne of the saddest stories I ever heard about a lawyer in love was that of New Zealander Gary Alderdice – known as ‘Never Plead Guilty Gary’. After the collapse of his marriage in the 1990s, the Hong Kong-based Alderdice started making trips on the hydrofoil to neighbouring Macau (pictured). Gambling there had been invaded by the Russian mafia, in association with the local triad organisations, and a whole army of prostitutes (mainly from the Vladivostok area) was working the hotel circuit. Among them was the exceptionally attractive strawberry blond Natalya Samofalova. Her contract had been signed in Macau and, as protection for themselves, the local triads had very sensibly retained her work papers. For Alderdice, it was a question of love at first sight and his feelings do seem to have been reciprocated. He took up with Samofalova in early April 1994 and the pair stayed first in his hotel room and then in a cottage at the Westin Resort until early May. Then came Alderdice’s fatal mistake: he declined to pay her owners for her services. When her papers came up for renewal, the triads refused to return them to her and she was obliged to leave. On 23 June Alderdice flew to Vladivostok, where he was met by Samofalova at the airport. He had, it was said, taken with him about $150,000. The next day Samofalova’s mother called at her flat and found both Alderdice and her daughter dead. It was thought that Alderdice had taken the money to buy his girlfriend’s contract but the pair had been killed to demonstrate the power of the mafia, who had left the money untouched. Five years after the killings came a confession from a woman the police would initially identify only as Olga, who had worked with Samofalova. She claimed she and two other men had been persuaded to rob the pair. Alderdice had been shot and Samofalova tied to a chair and tortured to make her reveal the whereabouts of the money, but only $2,000 was found. Unfortunately for the police, Olga succumbed to a drug overdose just four days later. One of the men subsequently denied the story. The other man, whom she said had actually shot the pair, is thought to have died in a gangland killing back in 1995. It is just one of those stories where the suspects are conveniently dead or untouchable. James Morton is a writer and former criminal defence solicitorlast_img read more

Hansom

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAYlast_img read more

A painful omission

first_imgSubscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

Stub out those roll-ups

first_imgStay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletters To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe now for unlimited access Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our communitylast_img read more

Right from the start

first_imgSubscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access Get your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more

Building buys a pint … for University of East London students

first_imgGet your free guest access  SIGN UP TODAY Subscribe to Building today and you will benefit from:Unlimited access to all stories including expert analysis and comment from industry leadersOur league tables, cost models and economics dataOur online archive of over 10,000 articlesBuilding magazine digital editionsBuilding magazine print editionsPrinted/digital supplementsSubscribe now for unlimited access.View our subscription options and join our community Subscribe now for unlimited access To continue enjoying Building.co.uk, sign up for free guest accessExisting subscriber? LOGIN Stay at the forefront of thought leadership with news and analysis from award-winning journalists. Enjoy company features, CEO interviews, architectural reviews, technical project know-how and the latest innovations.Limited access to building.co.ukBreaking industry news as it happensBreaking, daily and weekly e-newsletterslast_img read more